6 Things To Do With Zucchini that Are Not Zoodles

By Kim McDevitt, MPH RD on August 11, 2017 , categorized in In the Kitchen

6 new ways to use zucchini blog

Are you drowning in a sea of garden zucchini? I am. And while I love a good zoodle dish I’m also ready to move on to new fresh zucchini recipes. And my family seconds that notion.

The good news is that there is LOTS to do with zucchini. You can incorporate it into a variety of dishes. From simple to complex, everything from breads to cookies to lasagna. You can even throw it into your next smoothie!

Zucchini is comprised of over 70% water.1https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/3180?fgcd=&manu=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=35&offset=&sort=&qlookup=zucchini Nutritionally, zucchini provides you with fiber, vitamins and minerals. It’s also low calorie with one cup delivering approximately 20 calories. Here are six unexpected ways to add more zucchini to your diet!

1. Zucchini Pizza
Create crusts by hollowing out zucchini vertically or cut into rounds for mini pizzas by cutting the zucchini horizontally. However you decide, this is a dish both kids and parents will enjoy making and eating. To make, simply cut zucchini your preferred way, drizzle with olive oil and top with store bought or homemade sauce, and add toppings of your choice. Bake at 375°F for 20 minutes or until tender.Take your pizza a step further by using shredded zucchini as the base of pizza in place of a traditional grain based crust. You can use this pizza crust recipe and swap out the cauliflower for shredded zucchini. Replace recommended measurements for cauliflower cup for cup for zucchini.

2. Oven Fries
Make some veggie fries by cutting zucchini into spears, dipping into non-dairy milk followed by almond meal, or a breadcrumb of your choice. Bake at 400°F degrees for approximately 10 minutes. If you’re feeling really creative try making them into veggie tots for a play on tater tots.

3. Stirred into Oats
Have you ever heard of “zoats”? Trust me, it’s a thing. And that thing is zucchini, rolled oats, chia seeds, and sometimes a scoop of protein stirred in. It’s super simple and leaves you with a hearty bowl of oatmeal with some veggies that no one can taste. Combine 1/2 cup of oats, one cup shredded zucchini, one tablespoon of ground flax or chia seed with water or non-dairy milk of your choice and cook until liquid is absorbed. Stir in ½ scoop of vanilla or chocolate protein powder, and top with fresh berries or banana, cinnamon and a sprinkle of granola for crunch.

4. Lasagna
You can replace zucchini for all or half of the noodles in your next lasagna or just add in as an additional ingredient. Either way you can’t go wrong. Follow this simple plant-based lasagna recipe that is perfect for a crowd.

5. Burger Topper
Top your next veggie burger with not just the usual. Make a tangy relish topping that uses zucchini instead of pickles.

6. Blended into Smoothies
Ever heard of blending zucchini into a smoothie? Yes, a smoothie! Slice up zucchini that is close to passing its prime and throw into a freezer bag and into the freezer alongside your frozen fruit stash. The next time you make a protein smoothie try adding a handful of zucchini in place of banana or avocado. You’ll get a creamy texture, a smoothie with even more nutrients, and a blend lower in calories and sugar (which is good for those who are watching their carbohydrate or sugar intake or are allergic to banana or avocado). Best yet, you can detect no signs of zucchini in the finished product.

 

My final tip: when preparing zucchini, sprinkle zucchini with salt, let sit for 10 minutes and then pat dry with a towel. The salt helps draw out the excess moisture, making your dishes crisp instead of soggy!

 

Get through these ideas and we bet you’ll be wishing you planted even more! Share in the comments below your favorite ways to use your garden zucchini. Enjoy!

Tagged with
burger topper fries lasagna oats pizza plant-based nutrition smoothie zoodles zucchini zucchini tips

Kim McDevitt, MPH RD

Kim McDevitt works at Vega as a National Educator. A runner, cooking enthusiast, plant-focused flexitarian, Kim has passionately built her career in nutrition. Noticing that her running performances were closely tied to what she was eating, Kim decided to study nutrition and pursue advanced degrees in Dietetics and Public Health, to better understand the power of food in performance. Today, Kim specializes in sports nutrition to enhance athletic performance and focuses on realistic and approachable ways for improving health through educated dietary choices within an active lifestyle.

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